Colorado Marijuana Potency Cap Backers Cancel Campaign

Supporters of a proposed ballot measure to cap cannabis product potency at 16% THC abruptly halted their campaign on Friday, saying they didn’t have the financial resources to beat the marijuana industry.

“We simply couldn’t go toe-to-toe with the marijuana moguls,” Ali Pruitt, one of the two primary proponents of Amendment 139, said in a press release. “The marijuana industry built a wall of money between us and the November ballot that we simply couldn’t break through.”

Colorado’s cannabis industry recently formed a coalition called the Colorado Health Research Council, which had raised over $300,000 to fight Amendment 139. If passed into law, the potency cap would have banned the vast majority of marijuana products on the legal market.

The release – without citing any documentation – alleged that the cannabis industry had committed “tens of millions” of dollars to defeating the potency cap. And, contrary to industry assertions, it stated that the proposed measure would not have had an impact on medical cannabis. It also charged that industry leaders bought off signature gatherers “to keep the initiative from moving forward.”

The campaign further promised that the fight to “rein in an out-of-control marijuana industry” is not over.

12 comments on “Colorado Marijuana Potency Cap Backers Cancel Campaign
  1. Clif Croan on

    It wasn’t the brightest idea in the first place. Just harassment.

    Using the analogy of alcohol – I can drink wine, beer, or spirits. They have varying potency like cannabis. If I want a “double shot” there shouldn’t be anyone to tell me otherwise.

    Reply
  2. Victoria Smith on

    Anti-ganjaites: $300k = $Millions; cannabis business owners bribed hundreds of signature gatherers; “this fight is not over.”
    This helps explain the quick demise of the initiative. These people are out of touch with reality and prefer to substitute their own opinions for fact.

    Reply
  3. Matt on

    It seems slightly hypocritical that a movement mostly backed by people who claim to hate big business and underhanded strategy would possibly slink to that level. It’s not surprising, because everyone’s justified in their own eyes….I just hope these allegations aren’t true.

    If it truly wasn’t going to affect MMJ potency, then this absolutely should’ve been given more consideration. The only REAL ground opposition can stand on is MMJ. Other than that, maybe the cap being a bit too low. That issue is, no one actually needs concentrates for recreational use, it’s overkill. And before people start talking about alcohol, I’d remind you everclear isn’t legal in some states.

    Reply
    • Hendo on

      I smoke concentrates daily. I used to smoke bud but to get relief from my pain/anxiety I need to smoke alot. So I smoke concentrates. I smoke nearly a half gram a day. I’m not intoxicated when I smoke this much either. I’m as clear headed as a preacher on Sunday. This is because I have a tolerance that lets me eat 500mg edibles and not get high… (yea it sux…)

      Reply
    • Hendo on

      The best part of concentrates is it doesn’t affect my breathing. I had smokers cough from smoking bud all the time. I switched to concentrates, no more “chronic” cough. 😀

      Reply
      • Matt on

        That’s the point though, isn’t it. If this wasn’t going to stop a medical user, then potency caps to at least some limit are a good thing. You can talk about how no one dies or blah blah blah, but as country we should want legalized marijuana limited in a reasonable way. No one needs to get a tolerance like yours from recreational use. I would adamantly argue that a tolerance as high as yours is similar to that of severe alcoholism (albeit for medical).

        The “pure” cannabis supporters are going to ruin legalization. Wait for the hammer.

        Reply
  4. Brett Roper on

    Seems to me to be politics as usual and some sour grapes about being on the loosing side? Should we reduce proofing of alcoholic beverages too? Protecting your kids should expand to a much greater degree than demonizing one product while ignoring others that are far more impactful on our children’s lives. As I recently read that Colorado youths we less likely that those in other states to access and use cannabis related products? I am not connecting the dots correctly here? And what about the taxes (as well as returned over collected taxes) that are going to schools? The great thing about being a US citizen is that we all have choices and the citizens of CO seemed to have made theirs.

    Reply
    • Matt on

      Alcohol can only go up to 100 proof, to start, so it’s not really the same sort of thing. You can keep adding more THC. Beyond that, there are limits to proofing in many places. The easiest example is that everclear isn’t legal in every state, at least not at 99%.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *