Dozens of Seattle Dispensaries Could Be Shuttered

Medical marijuana dispensaries in Seattle would need to obtain a special local business license by July 2016 or shut down under a proposal that seeks to align the city’s policies with new state regulations on the MMJ industry.

The plan – presented by the city’s mayor – would require dispensaries operating in Seattle before January 2013 to obtain a license from both the state and the city, according to the Puget Sound Business Journal. Those that do not win both licenses would be forced to close.

One major caveat: Dispensaries that opened in Seattle after January 2013 would not qualify for a city license, the newspaper reported. All of those dispensaries would therefore need to cease operations, even if they won a license from the state.

The mayor estimated that roughly half of the estimated 100 dispensaries currently operating in Seattle would have to close under the plan, which still needs approval from the city council.

Washington passed a bill earlier this spring rolling the state’s medical marijuana program into its recreational cannabis market. Under those regulations, dispensaries would need to get a license under the state’s rec program by summer 2016 or close.

Several hundred unregulated cannabis dispensaries exist in the state, including an estimated 200-plus in Seattle and its suburbs.

2 comments on “Dozens of Seattle Dispensaries Could Be Shuttered
  1. ghost on

    Basic politics. those that receive city licenses are very likely to be those who are already connected or contributed heavily to funds of those above those who are rewarding the licenses.
    If you think FIFA is corrupt you have never smelled city politics it doesn’t matter which city in which state.

    sorry mom & pop doesn’t matter how well monied, intentioned or clean you are. or if you have run legal and profitable over the years you are basically double f00ked.

    Reply
  2. Rick Fague on

    This is a very awkward period for MJ businesses in Washington. Between the banking issues and the problem of integrating a largely unregulated MMJ market into a tightly regulated retail market, there’s a lot of fear and uncertainty in the air.

    My company offers solutions for most of the problems MJ businesses have to deal with right now but it’s quite a challenge trying to build an MJ business in an environment filled with so much uncertainty.

    Our products and services were built with regulatory compliance in mind, with input from state and federal authorities, and we feel we’re pretty close to receiving their official approval as well, and it’s STILL a tough sell here, even though we’re already doing business in Colorado with no problems.

    These growing pains will work themselves out over time, hopefully the good players will take their rightful place in the legal marketplace and the bad players will be gray market just like they are now.

    I find myself wishing sometimes that we in the Washington MJ industry could relax a little, focus less energy on fear and more on the future. If we’re doing the right thing, doing our best to follow the rules and regulations, the future looks very bright indeed.

    Reply

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