Let Liquor Stores Sell CBD, Utah Lawmaker Says

Liquor control departments serve as the regulatory authority for medical marijuana programs in several states. In Utah, a lawmaker is taking that idea a big step further, suggesting that liquor stores themselves actually distribute CBD products.

Republican State Sen. Steve Urquhart has floated the idea of having Utah’s state-regulated liquor stores sell CBD extracts to registered patients. He pitched it has an alternative to other proposals that would route distribution through pharmacies, which are subject to federal oversight.

“Right now, [the] DEA seems pretty hands-off on CBD oil, but nothing guarantees they’re going to remain that way,” Urquhart told the Salt Lake Tribune.

Utah legalized the use of certain high-CBD cannabis extracts for medical treatment earlier this year. But the law doesn’t allow the production or sale of the products, so it’s unclear how patients are actually supposed to get the drug.

Lawmakers are now weighing potential solutions to the problem.

Allowing liquor stores to sell CBD products would be a first for the industry. No other state allows any type of medical marijuana product to be distributed in that fashion.

It would also likely be a highly controversial move, as many cannabis professionals are already concerned about the possibility of alcohol-related companies entering the industry.

4 comments on “Let Liquor Stores Sell CBD, Utah Lawmaker Says
  1. ken gow on

    This would be a wrong move to allow a medical product to be sold in a liquor store. Federal oversight can be helpful, if done the right way. You do not see Oxycodone or Xanax sold in liquor stores and there is a reason for that, abuse. It would be interesting to see who is a main campaign supporter of Republican State Sen. Steve Urquhart to see if the large beer/wine/liquor companies are contributors.

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  2. Brian Dawe on

    Please do not equate CBD with Oxycodone, Xanax or any other dangerously addictive drug. The current misunderstanding and mislabeling of CBD is one of the MM movement’s biggest obstacles. It is what has led to the proliferation of shortsighted legislation like the types we are seeing in Utah, Kentucky, Georgia and elsewhere. Nomenclature is critical in our efforts to educate the uneducated and to turn back years of propaganda. Even on these pages with like- minded citizens sharing information we need to make sure that we spread truth and address the ignorance of the masses on the benefits of cannabis and cannabis extracts. CBD presents no danger to anyone’s health as does the highly addictive and dangerous Oxycodone and Xanax. To even have them in the same sentence with CBD can cause more misunderstanding.

    Reply
  3. ken gow on

    That was not my intention with the examples. Poor choice on my part. I should have said Nyquil or Claritin which also is not sold in liquor stores. Claritin was originally a prescription, now it OTC. It is my belief that selling MM in liquor stores would be the wrong direction, thats all.

    Reply

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