Cannabis business ties can lead to citizenship denial, immigration agency says

Immigration authorities on Friday said they could deny citizenship to anyone with any involvement with marijuana – regardless of whether it’s legal in the state where they live – because MJ is still illegal under federal law.

The announcement comes weeks after officials in Colorado – where recreational and medical marijuana are legal – complained to U.S. Attorney General William Barr that the Department of Justice should adjust its policies as they pertain to employees working for cannabis operations in states where the MJ industry is legal.

The Colorado plea stemmed from at least two green-card holders being denied citizenship because they worked or had worked in marijuana-related jobs in Denver.

However, the updated guidance released Friday by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services stipulates that people who use marijuana or are involved with the industry in any way fail to have “good moral character,” a prerequisite for people who have legal permanent residence to gain American citizenship.

“U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services is required to adjudicate cases based on federal law,” the agency’s spokeswoman, Jessica Collins, said in a statement.

“Individuals who commit federal controlled substance violations face potential immigration consequences under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), which applies to all foreign nationals regardless of the state or jurisdiction in which they reside.”

Immigrants who apply for citizenship must first fill out a 20-page form known as the “N-400,” which asks about work, family and criminal histories. It doesn’t, however, specifically ask if a person has used marijuana or has ties to the legal cannabis industry.

Julia Gelatt, a senior policy analyst for the Washington DC-based Migration Policy Institute, said the immigration policy could make some people nervous about applying for citizenship.

“Whether or not it has a real impact is whether adjudicators decide to ask about (marijuana ties),” she said.

– Associated Press

2 comments on “Cannabis business ties can lead to citizenship denial, immigration agency says
  1. Kris on

    First of all, marijuana needs to be legalized on a Federal level. PERIOD. IT IS HELPING MANY wounded warriors and lots of other people.
    Cannabis has medicinal benefits and is less dangerous than alcohol, Valium, and Xanax.

    The class schedule for MJ is class 1…

    Schedule 1 (I) drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined by the federal government as drugs with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse. Schedule 1 (I) drugs are the most dangerous drugs of all the drug schedules with potentially severe psychological or physical dependence.
    Herion
    Ecstasy
    Methaqualone
    Peyote
    Marijuana
    REALLY!!! I’ve never heard of someone stealing from their grandmother or selling their bodies for weed.

    The Controlled Substances Act (CSA), part of the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970, is the legal cornerstone of the government’s war against drug abuse. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has divided these substances into five categories, called “schedules,” based on each drug’s (1) potential for abuse, (2) safety, (3) addictive potential and (4) whether or not it has any legitimate medical applications.
    #4 ever heard of medical mj???

    Schedule 2 (II) drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a high potential for abuse, less abuse potential than Schedule 1 (I) drugs, with use potentially leading to severe psychological or physical dependence. These drugs are also considered dangerous.
    SO MJ IS WORSE THAN OPIATES, Cocaine and Meth
    (LSD)
    Marijuana (cannabis)*
    Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy)
    Methaqualone
    Peyote

    Schedule 2 (II) Drugs
    Schedule 2 (II) drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a high potential for abuse, less abuse potential than Schedule 1 (I) drugs, with use potentially leading to severe psychological or physical dependence. These drugs are also considered dangerous.

    Examples of Schedule 2 (II) Drugs:
    Cocaine
    Methamphetamine
    Methadone
    Hydromorphone (Dilaudid)
    Meperidine (Demerol)
    Oxycodone (OxyContin)
    Fentanyl
    Dexedrine
    Adderall
    Ritalin

    Let’s just skip schedule 3

    The Controlled Substances Act (CSA), part of the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970, is the legal cornerstone of the government’s war against drug abuse. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has divided these substances into five categories, called “schedules,” based on each drug’s (1) potential for abuse, (2) safety, (3) addictive potential and (4) whether or not it has any legitimate medical applications.

    Examples of Schedule 1 (I) Drugs:
    Heroin
    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD)
    Marijuana (cannabis)*
    Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy)
    Methaqualone
    Peyote

    Schedule 2 (II) Drugs
    Schedule 2 (II) drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a high potential for abuse, less abuse potential than Schedule 1 (I) drugs, with use potentially leading to severe psychological or physical dependence. These drugs are also considered dangerous.

    Schedule 4 (IV) Drugs
    Schedule 4 (IV) drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a low potential for abuse and low risk of dependence.

    Examples of Schedule 4 (IV) Drugs:
    Xanax
    Soma
    Darvon
    Darvocet
    Valium
    Ativan
    Talwin
    Ambien

    Examples of Schedule 4 (IV) Drugs:
    Xanax
    Soma
    Darvon
    Darvocet
    Valium
    Ativan
    Talwin
    Ambien

    Now you know Xanax, Valium, etc have a high potential for abuse and a very high risk of dependence. Have you ever seen someone trying to come of these BENZODIAZEPINES? They say it’s the worst.
    Then you know these are definitely worse than Class Schedule 1 Marijuana.

    Have you ever seen someone have to go to detox b/c of Cannabis?

    Looks like a lot of these drugs are definitely in the wrong class.

    Medical marijuana is replacing oxycodone for some.

    Reply

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