Chart: Connecticut’s medical marijuana patient count is skyrocketing

Connecticut isn’t the biggest medical marijuana market in the United States, but like plenty others, it’s experiencing massive growth.

In just the past 12 months, the state’s registered MMJ patient count has shot up 46%.

The number of registered medical cannabis patients has gone from 17,769 in April 2017 to 25,855 in April 2018, a spike of nearly 8,100 consumers, according to state data.

That translates to average monthly growth of about 3% for the patient pool, a great sign for the state’s nine dispensaries and four cultivators, especially since Connecticut is poised to add up to 10 more MMJ dispensaries.

Take into account that the program launched in 2014 with about 2,000 patients, and the growth is even more impressive.

The boom of the past 12 months follows a slight expansion last year of the qualifying condition list for MMJ patients, which added three pain-related ailments to the list, including migraines.

Another potential booster to patient counts: More physicians are licensed to recommend MMJ. As of May 4, 881 physicians had registered with the state program. One year ago, there were only around 600.

But strong patient growth has raised some concerns among dispensaries about future supply, as the state has made no indication that it will license additional cultivators.

Another potential concern for the MMJ industry in Connecticut: Several surrounding states have moved toward recreational markets, which may siphon off patients who don’t want to jump through the hoops for medical.

Eli McVey can be reached at [email protected]

John Schroyer can be reached at [email protected]

2 comments on “Chart: Connecticut’s medical marijuana patient count is skyrocketing
  1. Mike L. Wallace Jr. on

    Most illnesses of today treated by unnatural Synthetic Poison Drugs are caused by Endocannabinoid Deficiency. The creation of Marijuana Prohibition deprived our bodies important Endocannabinoid Systems of necessary Cannabinoids.

    Reply
  2. George Odell on

    If Connecticut simply added three common ailments: stress, anxiety and pain to the medical lisy they would allow most anyone to partake of the program.

    Patients would still need a doctors recommendation and the program would expand that much more.

    Instead they allow needless suffering and force patients to buy on the black market.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *