Key congressional panel to hold historic hearing on marijuana reform

A key U.S. House subcommittee will hold a landmark hearing next week about federal cannabis reform, a pivotal step in potentially advancing legislation that’s intended to protect state-legal marijuana businesses.

“Marijuana Laws in America: Racial Justice and the Need for Reform” is believed to be the first congressional hearing in history to examine cannabis in the context of ending the federal government’s prohibition of the plant.

The House Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security is scheduled to hold the hearing July 10.

“When it comes to ending federal prohibition, the connection between business and social justice are linked at the hip,” Neal Levine, CEO of the Cannabis Trade Federation (CTF), told Marijuana Business Daily.

Levine plans to testify at the hearing about the challenges of inconsistent federal and state cannabis laws. He is one of four witnesses invited to testify, having been invited by Republican members of the committee.

CTF has been lobbying hard for the STATES Act, which would protect state-legal cannabis businesses from federal interference.

Levine noted that a number of key reform bills such as the STATES Act have been assigned to the powerful Judiciary committee. The “Marijuana Laws in America” hearing marks the beginning of the process to possibly advance those bills out of that committee to the full House, he added.

Judiciary Committee chair Jerrold Nadler, a Democrat from New York, is expected to introduce his own marijuana legislation. It’s unclear whether Nadler’s panel also will embrace the STATES Act.

Jeff Smith can be reached at [email protected]

15 comments on “Key congressional panel to hold historic hearing on marijuana reform
  1. Jarred Bratcher on

    Please please legalize so I don’t have to take opiods anymore for my back problems. I can’t use marijuana now because I will lose my job and I love my job. Will you please help me and the millions like me??? This needs to be done like yesterday.

    Reply
    • Austin on

      What are the chances your work will allow marijuana in a drug test? Some legal states (from what i hear) still consider marijuana as it is scheduled and don’t allow employees to partake. I have ptsd and decided it was better off that i do something for myself than to keep pushing my boundaries for other people who don’t understand cannabis…take care of your needs first.

      Reply
  2. Pat on

    If this hearing was taking place with the public’s interest first and foremost, it should last about 2 minutes: “Let’s de-schedule cannabis. Because it’s all been a great and costly societal lie in the first place. The scheduling of cannabis as a schedule 1 substance has only benefited a handful of special interests groups whom were heavily moneyed, in order to make even more money ( but in the most obscene manner ) at the expense of mostly vulnerable populations in this country. De-scheduling will be a huge first step in dismantling this heinous machine that has been allowed to destroy millions of lives just to benefit a few in power whom created fake lines in the sand. This will send a message to these special interest groups such as the police unions, big pharma, big ag, big tobacco, big manufacturer’s associations, and the like, that this gravy 80 year old gravy train is over.”

    One minute to read out something like the aforementioned, and a minute to vote on it. What further needs to be said and/or done regarding this topic? Nothing. Anything else that comes up during this hearing means to me that the special interest’s have no compunction on letting this go. It is up to the congress to stop catering to b.s. special interest intentions; esp when the downside for the general public is so obvious.

    Reply
  3. Russ Carroll on

    We just want equality in legal services. Banking is key. Without the ability to utilize banking services (unless you’re a mega company that simply threatens their current bank to accept MRB funds or go elsewhere) we, the smaller, legal entities, are being forced underground. Well unfortunately, that’s where we came from! Let us do business above board.

    Reply
  4. Bill Mardison on

    Medical marijuana is helping save my life. I am battling cancer and it has improved my health and complimented the chemo. I was also on opioids for 50 years and no longer need to use them because of marijuana drops and Rick Simpson Oil. It is very difficult to find good products because of the rules set up differently in each state. Currently we have to go to another state to get the products that are helping me. We know many people who are afraid to take it because of all of the regulations, and many others who can’t take it because their jobs won’t allow it.

    Reply
  5. Jeff L on

    Yes do the right thing congress and legalize cannabis . Mostly everyone i know smokes it.
    It would be a win,win for everyone.
    Government gets big tax revenue boost and people get what they want.
    People get the health benefits of using it and feel better…..come on congress get with the program OR LOSE YOUR SEAT IN CONGRESS.
    This isn`t the 1970`s

    Reply
  6. Holly Sorensen on

    I WILL LOVE TO PAY CHEAPER PRICES ON THE BLACK MARKET ANYWAY BECAUSE OUR GOVERNMENT IS TO SLOW AND STUPID TO SEE THE FORREST THROUGHT THE TREES!!! WE HAVE THE MOST INCOMPETENT GOVERNMENT IN THE WORLD WITH REPUBLICANS AT THE LEAD. TIME TO FIRE THEM ALL, BUT TAKE YOUR TIME BECAUSE WHO CARES IF OUR SMALL BUSINESSES MAKE MONEY AND SAFELY!!! AS LONG AS I GET MY BLACK MARKET HIGH QUALITY WEED AT BETTER PRICES THAT OUR SILLY GOVERNMENT COULD EVER OFFER.

    Reply
  7. Tia on

    The tax revenue ALONE is worth every penny. Across the country our public schools, school teachers, school security, road conditions, first responders, parks & recreations, natural disaster funding, the homeless population, veterans housing and medical bills & the list goes on for miles, would all benefit from the tax revenue alone. Funding is cut or isn’t available for so many important & basic needs for ALL. The rich and the poor.
    Next is jobs jobs jobs. This helps each state employ workers who then turn around and give back a good bit of this income to the government for their taxes. The employment spectrum is very large. Jobs for… scientists, growing nurseries, dispensary rent for an empty building, bakers, tea & coffee producers, retail employment. With each of these departments they will employ multiple people. Which again, turn around and pay employment taxes.
    Then comes all of the scientific, test trails & confirmed information. This has always been required of any “something” being brought to market. Congress, u have all the PROVEN information that could possibly b given to make a logical and smart decision.
    Last but not least are your everyday “dealers”. Not every “dealer” is a bad person. You would b surprised the the every day Joe Blow who sells marijuana. It has been easily accessible for God knows how long. But the government DOES NOT get the tax benefits here. This is where if you snooze you loose. These suppliers will then be “out of work”. So now you have shut down what you deem a problem.
    Bottom line is…
    State & federal revenue
    Employment
    Health benefits
    No more “dealers”
    Please see the window this has created. If it produces all of these WONDERFUL things, what is the problem? Please end this insane situation.

    Reply
    • Jeff L on

      Great speech……Now copy and paste it and send it to every congress person.
      so maybe just maybe a bell will go off in their hat holder and will get cannabis to turn the same schedule as alcohol. Which in my opinion should be lower then alcohol. Never once heard of someone overdosing and dying on cannabis.

      Reply
  8. jerry hauser on

    I use marijuana for my chrons and works wonders and is far better than prescription and heck of a lot cheaper. Making it legal would just make it far easier to get and everyone would prosper from it. Its def a win win.

    Reply
  9. Robert busby on

    Congress I am 66 years old been smoking marijuana since I was 17 been smoken cigarettes since I was 16 don’t smoke crack meth any other drugs like I said I’m 66 years old and I have no cancer

    Reply

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