More California licensed cannabis labs approved to test flower

Be at the forefront of cannabis and psychedelics science and innovation. Register today & Save $200 on tickets to The Emerald Conference by MJBiz Science, April 1-3 in San Diego.


Six more licensed California cannabis labs are now compliant with new state rules and allowed to resume testing flower and non-infused pre-rolls.

The Tuesday announcement by the state’s Department of Cannabis Control (DCC) comes only days after the agency said that less than one-third of the state’s 37 licensed cannabis testing labs began the new year allowed to test products in those two categories.

That’s because, at that time, only 12 labs had submitted paperwork verifying compliance with new rules imposing a standardized testing method for THC.

Since then, an additional six labs have “demonstrated verification of the standardized cannabinoid method,” increasing to 18 the total number of California labs approved to test flower, according to the DCC.

The state-licensed labs currently approved to test flower and non-infused pre-rolls are:

  • 2 Rivers Labs.
  • AGQ Green Nature.
  • Anresco.
  • Bel Costa Labs Long Beach.
  • California Cannabis Testing Labs.
  • CaliGreen Laboratory.
  • Certified Ag Labs.
  • Confidence Analytics CA.
  • Encore Labs.
  • Harrens Lab.
  • HK Holding.
  • ILS Lab.
  • Infinite Chemical Analysis Labs.
  • Landau Laboratories.
  • pH Solutions.
  • Pure Cannalyst Lab.
  • Purity Medical Laboratories.
  • SC Laboratories California.

Licensed labs not currently on the DCC’s approved list may still become approved to resume testing flower and non-infused pre-rolls.

In the meantime, they are allowed to test edibles and concentrates.

However, any lab not on the approved list that’s still testing flower might be risking enforcement action, the DCC said.

Observers hope that standardized cannabinoid testing methods will help curtail THC potency inflation, which critics say is a widespread issue across the legal marijuana industry.

To date, states have taken limited action against labs found to have been inflating or falsifying testing data.