Welcome to the Cannabis Club: Connecticut Becomes 17th State to Adopt Medical Marijuana Law

It’s (nearly) official: Connecticut is set to join the ranks of states that allow qualified patients to use medical marijuana.

The Connecticut Senate has passed a bill that calls for the legalization of medical cannabis, bolstering the MMJ movement as it battles unprecedented challenges from the federal government. If the governor signs off on the measure as expected, Connecticut will become the 17th state in the nation to adopt medical marijuana laws.

The development is significant for several reasons:

#1. It gives MMJ another foothold on the East Coast, which could help convince lawmakers and voters in states like New York and Massachusetts to follow suit.

#2. It shows that states are still moving forward with medical marijuana legislation despite the federal crackdown.

#3. It opens up a new market for ancillary medical marijuana companies (lawyers, tech firms, etc.), especially those that are already established in other states and are looking to expand.

#4. It moves the country one step closer to reaching critical mass in terms of MMJ legislation. Experts say the tide could turn if half the states in the country approve MMJ legislation.

#5. It reaffirms the value of a heavily regulated model pioneered by states like Colorado. While some MMJ professionals prefer an open system with low barriers to entry, states are increasingly opting for tight regulations that limit the market to serious players. This type of system is good for the industry as a whole in the long run, as it boosts legitimacy.

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