Product Shortage, Price Increase Predicted in CO and OR

New testing regulations and quality control rules are going to bring about both a shortage of cannabis in Colorado and Oregon and a general price hike, according to industry estimates released on Wednesday.

The national spot price for a pound of cannabis will increase from $1,918 as of March 11 to $2,250 in August, “based both on new testing regulations and seasonal summer shortages,” according to a projection by Cannabis Benchmarks, which is a joint venture between Comprehensive Cannabis Consulting and New Leaf Data Services.

In Colorado and Oregon in particular, upcoming testing requirements will likely “knock significant amounts of cannabis out of circulation due to noncompliance for contamination and pesticide residues,” the release predicted.

Comprehensive Cannabis also pointed out that new testing requirements go into effect in July for Colorado’s medical cannabis producers, and in Oregon, testing labs will have to be certified and begin testing samples for 59 different banned pesticides that are known to be used by cannabis cultivators.

Nic Easley, CEO of Comprehensive, added in a phone call that similar shortages and price hikes will likely come to pass in every state that increases oversight and regulations for cannabis production.

6 comments on “Product Shortage, Price Increase Predicted in CO and OR
  1. guest on

    Sometimes When I smoke medical weed in Denver especially the 100$ oz it crackles or makes me gag because there is powdery mildew in it. Its about time they get the nasty product off the “medical” market. They are lucky there aren’t more lawsuits on contaminated product being that its a medical product that cancer, epilepsy, and a whole bag of other serious patients are using.

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  2. Chris on

    The massive grow ops are about to be handed a blow/setback that WILL create a shortage. It is amazing how the dollar tends to shade ones vision when quality/purity always wins. I am a cancer patient and am quite aware of the “cides” and the potential cancer risk; most quite high. Why anyone who has been to cancer camp would ingest a cancer causing agent is beyond the scope of my understanding. Clean water, real dirt, and God given sunlight are the only ingredients. Every time we stray from this “Rules”, we get burned.

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  3. bongstar420 on

    Oregon has 900 cultivation licensee in application. The article makes it sound like most of these producers are not qualified since I could see my self supplying the state with 40 ac. And we are talking compliant stuff thats mid grade like most people will be selling.

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