L.A. trade group seeks enforcement, felonies for tainted marijuana sales

On the heels of a cannabis trade group letter last week threatening a lawsuit against the city of Los Angeles over its alleged lack of enforcement against illegal marijuana shops, another MJ-focused organization sent a note to city leaders.

Instead of a threat, though, the second letter was an olive branch full of policy suggestions.

The Southern California Coalition (SCC) wrote to City Attorney Mike Feuer with a white paper that outlined suggestions for a more effective approach at clamping down on unlicensed MJ businesses that are still rampant throughout L.A. – including possible felony charges for endangering consumers by selling contaminated products.

The group focused its comments on how product testing and safeguarding the public from potentially toxic cannabis could be a better way to target illicit actors and also hailed the city attorney’s office for a new approach it began in April.

But the SCC’s letter suggested that testing should be expanded beyond pesticides to include testing for heavy metals, as is already required by the state for legal MJ products. The SCC noted that fentanyl-laced marijuana was recently seized in upstate New York.

The SCC offered several suggestions, but perhaps the most stringent was that unlicensed MJ retailers selling tainted product could possibly be charged with felonies instead of only misdemeanors or civil fines, which has been mostly the approach used by the city since the 2017 passage of Measure M.

“The maximum felony fines and jail time allowable when someone knowingly circulates a deadly product should be imposed on the operator of the shop, particularly if the flower came from the operator’s personal grow,” the SCC letter noted.

“When it’s clear that an illegal operation is circulating products with deadly additives, the city needs to abandon civil nuisance abatement and move quickly to indict the wrongdoer.”

4 comments on “L.A. trade group seeks enforcement, felonies for tainted marijuana sales
  1. Pat on

    GOOD LUCK W/THAT..

    “The Southern California Coalition (SCC) wrote to City Attorney Mike Feuer with a white paper that outlined suggestions for a more effective approach at clamping down on unlicensed MJ businesses that are still rampant throughout L.A. – including possible felony charges for endangering consumers by selling contaminated products.”

    “The maximum felony fines and jail time allowable when someone knowingly circulates a deadly product should be imposed on the operator of the shop, particularly if the flower came from the operator’s personal grow,” the SCC letter noted.

    “When it’s clear that an illegal operation is circulating products with deadly additives, the city needs to abandon civil nuisance abatement and move quickly to indict the wrongdoer.”

    RESPONSE:

    The Public Health Association wrote to City Attorney I. Pei Freelie, with a white paper that outlined suggestions for a more effective approach to clamping down on licensed and unlicensed tobacco businesses that are still ( and have been for a long, long time ) rampant throughout the country – including felony charges for endangering/( and killing 500,000 annually in the U.S. ) consumers by selling known carcinogenic compounds and additives into all tobacco products: cigarettes, cigars, chewing tobacco, etc..

    As Willie Wonka said in 1971 when Gloop fell into the chocolate river and contaminated it: “Help! Police! Murder! It’s too late..the suction’s got him now. Watch the pipe. Terrific pressure is building up behind the blockage.. The suspense is terrible. I hope it will last..!”

    Reply
  2. CLIFTON MIDDLETON on

    This is all BS. The legal pot guys are busy trying to be cops, then should shut up and just be glad they can do what they do. Legal pot is a gigantic scam, totally unnecessary and corrupt.

    Reply
  3. Concerned Dude on

    Yeah, seriously … Felonies? Get off your high horse SCC. Half of the legal operators in the state are only where they are now because they operated in the wild west that was the 215 regulatory framework and made enough cash to survive the transition to the BS we’re in now. I would bet my left hand that at one time or another they sold product that contained residual solvent, pesticides, foreign matter, or heavy metals prior to the passage of P. 64 a and the advent of required QA testing. The SCC should focus on consumer advocacy by fighting against the dozens of county-wide bans on dispensaries and deliveries instead of trying to police the originators of the retail cannabis industry. I’m all for consumer safety and clean product, but throwing around white pages with felony recommendations is so out of pocket.

    Reply
  4. Lezli Engelking on

    Are legal operators thinking through the implications of this policy suggestion? If an illegal operator can received a felony for selling tainted cannabis products- why wouldn’t the same be true for those with a license? Be careful what you wish for! If that was to become a common regulation throughout state cannabis programs, it could throw a monkey wrench through the whole industry. Because even today, with all of the explosive growth of this industry- LEGAL DOES NOT MEAN SAFE.

    Reply

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