US attorney general reiterates commitment to federal marijuana ban

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions isn’t wavering in his opposition to marijuana, even if it’s not a top priority for President Trump and the rest of his administration.

Sessions told a meeting of the National Sheriffs’ Association on Monday that it’s “frustrating” that he’s at loggerheads with others in Congress over marijuana policy, Forbes reported.

The attorney general was almost certainly referring to U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner, a Colorado Republican, who’s been delaying votes on Department of Justice nominees in response to Sessions’ decision to rescind several Obama-era cannabis policies in early January.

In a prepared version of his remarks, Sessions said:

“I cannot and will not pretend that a duly enacted law of this country – like the federal ban on marijuana – does not exist.

“Marijuana is illegal in the United States – even in Colorado, California and everywhere else in America.”

The president has not made cannabis policy a top priority or mentioned the topic specifically since taking office, with the exception of one ambiguous signing statement last May.

Sessions has also not taken any direct action – such as raiding state-licensed recreational marijuana businesses, something that would be entirely within his power – other than issuing his own DOJ policy memo on Jan. 4.

The Rohrabacher-Blumenauer Amendment prevents him from taking action against state-legal medical marijuana companies.

31 comments on “US attorney general reiterates commitment to federal marijuana ban
  1. Jamfer Jones on

    You can’t reason with a retard. Trump has already lost my vote in the next round. His drunken sailor spending and weed ignorance is the main reason and appointing the barely educated Sessions as AG while Canada is supplying 20,200 German drug stores with medicinal cannabis? Weed never killed anybody while alcohol, tobacco, meth and heroin etc. are deadly and in the same schedule… weed schedule one is a lie and should be fought in the Supreme Court.

    Reply
    • Bruce on

      Ok, let’s get down to basics. The current law holds cannabis illegal in the U S. Federal law superceeds State law. There is currently only illegal cannabis. If you want legal pot, the U S congress needs to update and/or pass a new Law legalizing cannabis in its many uses. Until then, the Attorney General has the responsibility of upholding the current law. The previous administration looked the other way instead of passing new laws. I am in complete favor of legalizing cannabis in all of its used. Call your Senators and Representative and tell them you want pot legalized.

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      • David fFlores on

        It does no good to educate any of these officials because they only serve the people who voted them in and the big companies that donated to their campaign who profit from Cannabis prohibition. Things wouldn’t be in the current state they’re in now if states didn’t handle Cannabis on a state level. There would be no progress and we would just sit in the sidelines and watch other countries benefit from this plant.

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      • Red on

        Bruce, I direct you to the 10th amendment and then ask “Where in the constitution is the power to regulate ANY crop farming, much less marijuana, delegated to the federal government?”

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      • Rick F on

        Your statement is not accurate. The CSA section 903 (“Controlled Substance Act”) pre-empts Federal enforcement against the States (Congress limited the AG’s enforcement power) as long as no “positive conflict” exists. Put simply, Federal Law does not supercede State law under the CSA.

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        • Brett Von Bergen on

          His statement is completely accurate, state’s rights have been dead since the Civil War (bad analogy, but used many times by conservative republicans), second since Nixon’s drug war and CSA, and third since the Supreme Court struck down medical marijuana protections in 2001. Federal court precedent has maligned states rights which in effect has marginalized the argument of states rights even being a thing anymore, which neo-republicans love to tout without understanding they’ve been gone for awhile. This all essentially means Federal law always supersedes state laws, since state laws can’t supersede federal ones-which is exactly why cannabis is still ILLEGAL everywhere. Case closed.

          Reply
    • Randall Guinn on

      And you think the other side was going to legalize any faster??? I am discouraged with both sides not viewing the wishes of their constituents as priority over their own bias…. Neither Republican or Democrat have our best intentions in mind while they play these partisian games.

      Reply
      • Steve Harvey on

        Follow the money…. Big Pharma, Drug Testing Labs and Incarcreation industries in this country are huge cash cows. There is no incentive for any legislation to pass because people are making a living from keeping it as a Schedule I.

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        • Gentle Jim on

          We will have to offer bigger bribes than the current lobbies are, but our elected officials currently have no fear, so we should contact them and give them some “we will never again elect you” fears.

          Reply
    • greg mcarthur on

      It is only obvious that every thing that brought any legal action against marijuana was born of absolute lies . Lies by the people who are suppose to protect us. We who keep dying in mass through legal means such as cigarettes . If our government might be interested in our trust instead of a growing revolution , perhaps our government should acknowledge their breach .
      We all remember kindergarten. When caught lying did we get a cookie and pretend it didn’t happen ? Not at my school. I can still taste soap.
      As a representative of the very office that originally broke the law , Mr. Sessions should taste soap. Be ashamed and work to right the original sin .

      Reply
  2. wolf on

    He needs to go back to his padded room and have some warm milk and a weed butter cookie and someday when his LEGAL drugs, such as Thorazine wears off and he can think straight enough to talk.

    Reply
  3. Lance Brofman on

    If new AG Sessions decides to outsource to Mexico and Canada the 250,000 jobs of Americans producing and distributing cannabis in those states where the voters have legalized it, Mexico should legalize it as well so the profits would go to tax paying entities rather than the illegal cartels. Beer is produced by legitimate businesses in Mexico now so can cannabis.

    Reply
  4. John Cappellini on

    I do not understand why an appointed official (not elected) gets to sit on his high horse and insult everyone’s intelligence and act like the almighty moral police. It is not his job to pass judgment on people and act like some holier than thou minister shaming his flock. These are the kind of people who create hatred and war with their intolerance of what other people believe and do. No place for this in a democracy.

    With this type of bias he is not fit for the job he was hired to do. He may be right to some degree on the technicalities of the law, but the technicalities of the law shall not over rule reason and substance. His flat out denial of the benefits of cannabis is ludicrous.

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  5. Martin Santis on

    He’s an old fart from prehistoric 1950’s white america, and he is pushing this shit that will bodyslam his feeble bones! That damned evil elf!

    Reply
  6. rick c on

    You guys are a bunch of goobers. Sessions is the chief enforcer & will do as the law prescribes. He doesn’t make the laws. So lets keep voting to change the damn laws.

    Reply
    • GregRx on

      Thumbs up. Actually helps us as the legal definition of a schedule one drug, should not apply. Just like “dreamers” , changing bad law is the solution.

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    • Zach on

      Absolutely agree! Law enforcement needs to enforce the laws… if it is a bad or antiquated law (as most of us here would agree) then it is up to Congress to fix. Don’t blame the Justice dept, lets put the laser focus on Congress to take action now!! Modify the controlled substance act and Reschedule Cannabis.

      Reply
  7. Marty Browne on

    What a long strange trip it’s been! Sometimes the light is shining, sometimes we can barely see. I’ve carried a felony for growing 12 plants in 1984, watched the helicopters of CAMP and just want to applaud those who are deadicating their lives to grow this magnificent plant. It doesn’t seem if poor Jeff has enough to do…

    Reply
  8. Joseph j Morgan, MD on

    Cannabis was first federally regulated by the Bureau of Chemistry, USDA along with 8 other psychoactive medicinal chemicals + acetanilide via the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906.

    The US Treasury secretly designed and enforced the MTA of 1937 without public health or science input. Cannabis should be regulated by USDA as per the 1906 regulations for purity, labelling, and misbranding.

    Reply
  9. Robert R White on

    It’s sad to note that the Federal regulation or shall I say ban on marijuana in the United States is at odds with sovereign states. I’m my personal opinion if a state accepts Federal funds while said state government”s executive branch allows the growth and supports usage of the fruit the Federal has choices to make. Those choices are to pull funding on all levels and restrict Federal oversight in the marijuana business. Meaning no raids or regulations what so ever. The feds need to overhaul it’s policies not on these type of issues but overall. The system is outdated and burdensome of sovereign states. Get it together.

    Reply
  10. Isabel Papagno on

    Sessions is doing the bidding of who he works for. The pharmaceutical companies pay our politicians a lot of money to maintain their monopoly. Plants given to us by God cannot be allowed.

    Reply
  11. Lori Jani on

    This Is My Opinion…

    People who are NOT EDUCATED about the meaningful purposes of the PLANT Cannabis should NOT have AUTHORITY to Make UNEDUCATED Decision Regarding the PLANT and the Health of People Living in the USA!

    The Chinese have records showing medicinal purposes dating back to 2525 BC.

    New York City, Boston & Philly were Booming in the late 1880’s with Hash Clubs, New York had 300 Hash Clubs in the late 1880-1890’s!

    Tobacco Kills, Alcohol Kills…….CANNABIS DOES NOT KILL, IT IS PROVEN TO HELP SICK PEOPLE!

    EDUCATION IS ESSENTIAL!

    Reply
  12. d on

    Sessions needs to INDICT those around him at the DOJ and the FBI….NOW….and leave States Rights alone…go after the REAL criminals who work for YOU….imho

    Reply
  13. al simon on

    Follow the money,big pharma, koch, adelman, the prison industrial complex the prison guard union have continued to spend a lot of money, to keep marijuana a class one drug. Now their trying to do the same thing with Krartom. Cut the Dea and Fda’s budgets maybe they will get the message.

    Reply

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