DEA warns Georgia pharmacies to halt low-THC medical marijuana oil sales

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The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration is warning traditional Georgia pharmacies that marijuana possession and sales are federally prohibited.

The caution flag stems from the Georgia Board of Pharmacy’s June approval of rules for independent pharmacies to sell low-THC medical cannabis oil products in the state and the ensuing signoff by Gov. Brian Kemp.

The DEA, which has largely avoided marijuana enforcement in individual states during the Biden administration, has a different view, however.

The notice from the agency’s Diversion Control Division reminds DEA-registered pharmacies that they must abide by federal laws and regulations, Atlanta TV station WXIA reported.

The Diversion Control Division did not immediately respond to an MJBizDaily request for comment.

The advisement that DEA-registered pharmacies are prohibited from dispensing Schedule 1 substances such as marijuana was released Nov. 27, roughly a month after independent pharmacies starting selling medical marijuana products to MMJ patients in Georgia.

The warning is somewhat curious considering the DEA currently is weighing whether to reschedule marijuana from Schedule 3 to Schedule 1.

The Georgia Board of Pharmacy, whose approval made the state the first U.S. marijuana market to approve the pharmacy retail channel. did not immediately respond to MJBizDaily inquiries.

Under the MMJ law Georgia passed in 2019, operators and pharmacists are permitted to sell only low-THC oil with up to 5% THC.

Flower is prohibited in the Georgia market, where sales didn’t begin until this year.

In late October, at least three pharmacies began selling medical cannabis products for Botanical Sciences, one of two operators licensed to produce MMJ in the state.

The pharmacies included:

  • Omega Pharmacy in Omega.
  • Robins Pharmacy in Warner Robins.
  • Tifton Drug Company in Tifton.

The pharmacy channel was expected to help expand product access in Georgia, where only seven MMJ dispensaries are open.