Poll: 71% of Texans support legalizing medical marijuana

Texas could become one of the next big cannabis markets, if state lawmakers listen to their constituents and a growing number of businesspeople interested in the trade.

To bolster that possibility, a whopping 71% of Texans back expanding medical cannabis availability (it’s currently legal only for those with epilepsy) to help more patients, according to a new poll.

The soonest that could happen, however, would be 2017, since the Texas Legislature doesn’t convene in 2016. But when it does reconvene next January, Colorado cannabis attorney Brian Vicente thinks there’s an excellent chance lawmakers will pass an updated law that could open up the state to the MMJ industry.

“There’s a real feeling that Texas will follow the trend we’ve seen in other states, where you pass a limited medical law, the sky doesn’t fall, then you pass a broader medical law,” Vicente said. “I think a lot of people see the writing on the wall.”

The current law, as written, is basically useless because it requires any patient to obtain a prescription for MMJ. That won’t happen because of marijuana’s status as a federally illegal narcotic, so the law is purely symbolic.

Nevertheless, Vicente said his office has been fielding “dozens” of calls from Texans eager to explore business opportunities in their home state. If that pressure is brought to bear at the state Capitol, Texas could prove fertile ground for cannabis entrepreneurs.

2 comments on “Poll: 71% of Texans support legalizing medical marijuana
  1. David Rhamey on

    Not gonna happen. I love the optimism but it’s very misplaced. Texas’ government is still very conservative, so are the state’s big money businesses as well as a great many of the people. I’m sorry I don’t think the polls are very accurate, I’m personally aware of whole cities that were never polled. Don’t get me wrong, I’m an MMJ candidate if it passes, so I’m all for it. I won’t hold my breathe though, I’m joining the refugee line out the door!

    Reply
  2. Phillip High on

    SB339, the Texas Compassionate Use Act, requires AT LEAST 3 dispensing organizations to be licensed by September 2017. The DPS (Department of Public Safety), who regulates the Compassionate Use Program, is not limiting the amount of dispensaries. They are allowing the market to determine how many dispensaries are needed and they will be granting licenses to EVERYONE that meets the required qualifications.

    As far as the use of the word “prescription”, it is defined in the regulations as “the entering of the patient and recommended dosage information into the Compassionate Use Registry.” This has nothing to do with prescriptions that are made through a DEA license. There is no overlap what so ever. Patients will go to their doctor, the doctor will enter them in to the Compassionate Use Registry and then they will go to their dispensary to get their medication. At no point will the doctor write them a prescription using their DEA license. The DPS said using the term prescription allowed them to provide greater protection for the patients and doctors (This is explained in detail under the FAQ on the DPS website).

    Texas is poised to be one of the greatest cannabis markets in the Nation. During the last Texas Republican and Democratic conventions, both parties added Full Medical Cannabis Programs to their platforms for 2017! It is going to happen in Texas and we will have a full medical program sooner than expected. Texas and the DPS are very business friendly. It is only $6,000 for a dispensing agent license and the license is basically unrestricted. You are free to cultivate, extract, process, test and dispense under the same license and there are no restrictions as far as plant counts and production.

    If you are interested in getting into the cannabis industry in Texas, please do your own research and the DPS website is a good place to start. They plainly explain everything and every possible concern in black and white.

    Best of luck,

    Phillip High – Medcan Foundation

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *