California marijuana track-and-trace data to remain confidential

The vast majority of California’s data from its cannabis track-and-trace system will be kept out of the public domain, according to a top state regulator.

That may surprise or disappoint those in the marijuana industry who expected to get a clearer picture of the legal supply chain later this year.

Licensed operators are uploading their product information into CCTT-Metrc, the electronic system used by the Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) to track marijuana supply from seed to sale.

Florida-based Franwell provides the software.

The CDFA is following the law by not revealing most information collected, a top official said.

“There is statutory language that protects that from disclosure,” said Richard Parrott, the director of the CDFA’s CalCannabis division.

“It’s our plain reading of the statute that says information contained in track and trace is exempt from disclosure unless it’s for state and local agencies carrying out their duties,” he added.

At the same time, Parrott expects the agency will release an overview of the state’s legal supply chain, possibly as a year-end recap.

That will allow industry officials to get a better idea of the size of the legal marijuana market.

“I believe that we will (release) some sort of year-end, high-level (summary),” Parrott said.

“We don’t really know yet what that will look like, but I believe there will be some sort of aggregate data that would be publicly available.”

He said he doesn’t know what the report will contain or when it will be released.

“But it would make sense.”

John Schroyer can be reached at [email protected]

3 comments on “California marijuana track-and-trace data to remain confidential
    • Pat on

      Kevin, I apologize ahead of time for being so thick. But, where exactly are these facts? Did I miss something of any relevance that you caught?

      And, BTW, a report, if it ever comes out in timely fashion, will avoiding divulging as many important to know “facts” as possible. Facts that anyone whom is not Parrott, his agency, or any of his partners ( private and public ) won’t be privy to. And, these are facts that the public and other non-partner agencies need to know so that they can understand how their tax dollars are being spent/managed. This means that only a handful of people ( compared to the 40 million in this state ) will have access ( and access to potentially cover it up ) to the truth. Why? They continue to have good jobs with the government by towing the line ( when some whom are in the know, should be blowing the whistle as if an F-5 tornado was headed in their direction ) …AND, the potential to get on with the very organization’s ( high paying jobs ) that they’re be entrusted and paid to regulate.

      State regulators and their associates ( not one ) are not blowing the whistle on this, because that F-5 is NOT headed in their direction. It’s headed straight to the state of ca. treasury.

      Reply
  1. Pat on

    Here we go again ( more of the same ):

    [ “The CDFA is following the law by not revealing most information collected, a top official said. It’s our plain reading of the statute that says information contained in track and trace is exempt from disclosure unless it’s for state and local agencies carrying out their duties,” he added.” ]

    This was from the Director of Cal Cannabis. Mr. Parrot did not cite WHAT STATUTE exactly. Or even “nearly.” So, what is the public supposed to get from all that? Nothing. He must have had the statute right in front of him; as it was “plain reading.” The CDFA seems to be hiding something big from the ca. tax paying citizen. However, it seems from what he stated, that perhaps that other state agencies ( such as those with auditing responsibilities ) have access to ALL of this information. Why didn’t a CDFA attorney give the public this info, directly? Esp. if “existing statute” was going to be cited. However, if fraud, waste and abuse was potentially discovered with a very close partner agency in a July 2019 audit, why wouldn’t these results compel more of the same as part of an ongoing ( wider ) investigation?

    Well, it seems like the iron is quite hot for these other ( auditing/law enforcement ) state agencies to do their jobs and get involved, now. Esp. on the heels of the revelation of the Ca. Dept. of Finance’s ( DOF ) recent audit of the Bureau of Cannabis Control ( BCC ); whom DEPENDS quite heavily on what the CDFA hands their way. But, it seems as if an attempt was made to make the BCC take the hit with the DOF limiting its audit to just the BCC. Again, the results of the BCC audit revealed an ongoing catastrophic disaster, with its likely basis in rampant corruption.

    “We don’t really know yet what that will look like, but I believe there will be some sort of aggregate data that would be publicly available. Parrott said he doesn’t know what the report will contain or when it will be released. But it will make sense.”

    Well, what Parrott has stated already doesn’t make any sense. None of it. That’s because he didn’t say anything of substance. There seems to be the avoidance of accountability ( by the CDFFA ) associated with Parrott’s language. And he get’s paid more than $170,000 comfy dollars a year to produce this kind of good work for the state of ca. citizens. Ummm…Uhhh… Geez… I really don’t know… I think this guy knows. How can he not know? He’s just not talking. This is what we’re getting from a DIRECTOR of the CDFA arm regulating cannabis.

    What does this possibly mean for everyone else that works below Parrott’s pay grade? A vision of people walking aimlessly around an office sucking on one thumb while the other is snuggly stuck up their rear ends …. comes to mind. And, getting paid/benefitted for it! We’re paying for all of it. So, when you file your annual ca. taxes; this is where some of it goes.

    Reply

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